Exploring How to Enhance Drug Delivery and Efficacy Through Nanoparticles and Macroscale Materials

Micrograph of a hydrogel, nanoparticle for gene delivery, and microneedle patch

Natalie Artzi, PhD, a principal investigator in the Brigham and Women’s Hospital Department of Medicine, has changed our basic understanding of biomaterials under different environmental and pathological states. Her lab is dedicated to designing smart biomaterial platforms and medical devices to improve human health.

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Proof of Concept: Presenilin-based Gene Therapy Targets Early-onset Alzheimer’s Disease Carrying PSEN Mutations

Mutations in human presenilin genes (PSEN1 and PSEN2) are the major cause of early-onset familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD). Building on the previous work, Brigham reserachers have published preclinical evidence that using gene therapy to deliver a functional copy of PSEN1 may someday be able to treat FAD.

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AAN 2024: Brigham Neurologists Share Latest Research

The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) will hosts its 2024 annual meeting on April 13 – 18 in Denver, CO and virtually. Faculty from the Department of Neurology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital will join thousands of international colleagues in presenting their latest research at AAN 2024.

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Case Report: Recurrent Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Cerebral Proliferative Angiopathy With Very Long-term Follow-up

Cerebral proliferative angiopathy (CPA) is a cerebral vascular malformation with distinctive features. Brigham and Women’s Hospital researchers present one of the few reports of long-term follow-up of a patient with hemorrhage in CPA: 32 years of data on a patient who had recurrent hemorrhage.

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Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and the Future of Neurosurgical Care

Timothy Smith, MD, PhD, MPH, a neurosurgeon-scientist in the Brigham’s Department of Neurosurgery, is exploring how to utilize artificial intelligence and machine learning to optimize neurosurgical patient care. He is co-author of three papers that offer a glimpse into how these technologies are transforming the field.

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Neuroimaging Abnormalities Across Substance Use Disorders Map to a Common Brain Network

Researchers have found that multiple substance use disorders (SUDs) map to their own common brain network, a finding that has therapeutic implications of its own.

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Gene Therapy Approach Shows Encouraging Survival Results in Some Patients With Glioblastoma

In a first-in-human, phase 1 trial, Brigham researchers sought to address challenges associated with treating glioblastoma multiforme by using an injected, engineered oncolytic virus that activated immune cells in the tumor. E. Antonio Chiocca, MD, PhD, senior author of the paper, recently presented the study findings.

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Review: Dural and Extradural Cavernous Venous Malformations

Neurologist and Neurosurgeon Talk, Use Computer, Analyse Patient MRI Scan, Diagnose Brain. Brain Surgery Health Clinic Lab: Two Professional Physicians Look at CT Scan. Close-up

In a two-part article in the Journal of Neurosurgery, surgeons at Brigham and Women’s Hospital discuss the epidemiology, clinical and radiologic features and surgical management of this group of pathologies. This summary covers part 1, dural and extradural CavVMs.

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SocialBit: A Wearable Sensor to Quantify Social Isolation

Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital have developed SocialBit, a smartwatch-based sensor designed to track the number and duration of daily interactions of the person wearing it.

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Case Reports: Novel Congenital Spinal Cord Malformation Not Requiring Neurosurgery

Double face. Split personality. Mood disorder. 2 Head silhouette.Psychology. Dual personality.

Physicians at Brigham and Women’s Hospital have encountered two newborn infants with a novel syndrome they believe arises from errors in notochord formation. They report its clinical and radiographic characteristics, describe their treatment approach and theorize about the embryogenesis of the malformation.

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