Inventing a “Better Way”: Developing Devices to Improve Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery

Jon I. Einarsson, MD, MPHJon I. Einarsson, MD, MPH, didn’t set out to be an inventor. Chief of the Division of Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Einarsson is a champion of minimally invasive approaches for their benefits to patients. But as a teacher and mentor, he knows that some techniques that benefit patients are slightly more challenging technically for trainees and others to master.
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Restoration of Infertility Using Patient-Specific Stem Cells

For women who want their own biological children, a diagnosis of infertility due to a lack of viable eggs can be devastating. Ovarian failure in women can have many causes, including aging, autoimmune disease and exposure to radiation therapy and certain chemotherapy drugs.
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Reducing Long-Term CV Risks after Preeclampsia through Online Intervention and Communication

An online intervention program for women who recently had preeclampsia has produced insight into how to reduce their future risks of cardiovascular disease.
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Novel SEQaBOO Study of Newborn Hearing Loss Foretells Role for Obstetricians in Genomic Medicine

The ear of a newborn baby only a few weeks old.As genetic and genomic sequencing become incorporated into newborn screening for hearing loss, patients may look to obstetricians for guidance on genetic testing decisions.

Auditory screening of newborns, mandated by most states in recent decades, now reaches an estimated 98 percent of newborns in the United States and has significantly reduced the average age for identifying congenital deafness. But adding genetic testing could drive more accurate diagnosis and personalized management during infancy’s critical window when the brain’s speech and language center is developing rapidly.
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Creating Healthy Families, One Embryo at a Time

embryo in a petri dish, Catherine Racowsky's labPredicting which IVF embryos are most likely to produce a healthy pregnancy is an ongoing challenge in the field. For embryologist Catherine Racowsky, PhD, it is a theme across her varied work as director of the IVF Lab at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, as a researcher of new techniques to find the healthiest embryos and as incoming president of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine.

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Stratifying Accreta Risks Before Labor to Improve Maternal Health

In the Hospital, Close-up Shot of the Doctor Doing Ultrasound / Sonogram Scan to a Pregnant Woman. Obstetrician Moving Transducer on the Belly of the Future Mother.With placenta accreta contributing to rising rates of severe maternal morbidity nationwide, the Program for Surgical Obstetrics and Placental Abnormalities at Brigham and Women’s Hospital is zeroing in on antepartum risk stratification as a tool for preserving maternal health.
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Research Efforts Focus on Link Between Hormonal Contraceptives and HIV Infection

drawing of the female reproductive tractAccording to the World Health Organization, more than half of all married or in-union women of reproductive age use some form of contraception. Additionally, the number of women around the globe who either use contraception or have an unmet need for family planning is expected to grow by more than 900 million over the next decade.
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New Approach Successfully Reduces Postcesarean Opioid Use

Opioid epidemic, drug abuse and overdose concept with scattered prescription opioids spilling from orange bottle with copy space. Hydrocodone is the generic name for a range of opiate painkillersOral opioids are regularly prescribed in the United States following cesarean delivery. But in the face of the growing opioid epidemic, the wisdom of this practice is under increasing scrutiny.
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New Clues in Predicting Spontaneous Preterm Birth and Preeclampsia

A pregnant Caucasian woman is indoors in a doctor's office. Her female doctor is wearing medical clothing. The woman is holding her stomach which the doctor writes on a clipboard.Seven to eight percent of pregnancies end in spontaneous preterm birth. About five percent of pregnancies involve preeclampsia. The problem is, we do not do a good job predicting which women are at heightened risk for these issues.
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Could ‘Precursor Escape’ Explain Advanced High-Grade Serous Carcinoma?

Over a decade ago, Christopher Crum, MD, of Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center (DF/BWCC), helped design the protocol that revealed the fallopian tubes to be the origin of most high-grade serous carcinomas (HGSCs), the tumor type afflicting over two-thirds of women with ovarian cancer.

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