Maximizing Function in Full Face Transplant Recipients

In 2011, Brigham and Women’s Hospital made headlines as the site of the nation’s first full face transplant. In July 2019, the Brigham set another milestone with the world’s first full face transplant procedure on a black patient and the oldest recipient ever. It was the ninth face transplant at the Brigham and the 15th nationwide.
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Exploring the Molecular Mechanisms of Age-Related Muscle Atrophy

Indirect immunofluorescence staining of laminin to assess myofiber morphology

Ronald L. Neppl, PhD, a molecular biologist in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, studies the molecular mechanisms that regulate the balance between anabolic and catabolic processes, and how imbalances in these physiological processes may lead to muscle atrophy.

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Research Efforts Focus on Underactive Bladder, a Common but Poorly Understood Condition

Doctor is making notes while listening to his patient

Physicians have a good sense of the symptoms and causes of overactive bladder, and clear guidelines exist for diagnosis. Thanks to advertising for pharmaceuticals and other products, even many members of the general public are aware of this condition and know that treatments are available.

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Managing the Cardiovascular Complications of Cancer Therapies

Doctors looking at computer screen

Advances in cancer therapies have allowed clinicians to better manage cancer and extend the lives of patients, but many therapies can produce serious cardiovascular side effects, from arrhythmias and hypertension, to cardiomyopathy and even heart failure.

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Preserving Fertility with Minimally Invasive Myomectomy

3D illustration of surgical robot on white background

Uterine fibroids are highly prevalent in women over 35. As more women delay childbearing, techniques to remove uterine fibroids (leiomyomas) while also preserving fertility are of increasing importance.

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Reevaluating Treatment Guidelines for Surgically Resected, N1-Positive Stage II NSCLC

doctor looking at imaging in computer

Stage II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents less than 10 percent of the approximately 234,000 cases of lung cancer diagnosed each year in the United States. Due to its relatively low incidence, not many papers have been published on stage II NSCLC. Furthermore, few clinicians have extensive experience treating it.

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Using ECMO as a Bridging Strategy to Lung Transplant

working ecmo machine in intensive care department, closeup oxygenator

The Lung Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital hosts the largest, and one of only two, lung transplant programs in New England. Through its use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), the center is improving the outlook for patients with end-stage lung disease who otherwise would be considered too sick for transplant.

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A Multidisciplinary Approach to Controlling Severe Asthma

Senior woman on medical exam

About 24.7 million Americans live with asthma, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Patients with severe asthma comprise 10 to 15 percent of this figure, said pulmonologist Elliot Israel, MD, co-director of the Severe Asthma Program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. And yet, he added, caring for this segment of asthma patients accounts for over half the cost of asthma care.

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Researchers Identify Promising New Drug Target for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Model depicting the mechanism by which selective targeting of PARP-2 attenuates FOXA1/AR signaling and inhibits prostate cancer growth
Model depicting the mechanism by which selective targeting of PARP-2 attenuates FOXA1/AR signaling and inhibits prostate cancer growth.

Although surgery and radiation provide good disease control for localized prostate cancer, developing long-lasting approaches for treating metastatic disease has been challenging because resistance to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) frequently develops.

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