Risk Factors Identified for Repeat COVID-19 in Patients With Systemic Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases

Jeffrey Sparks, MD, MMSc, and colleagues recently completed the first study of risk factors for repeat COVID-19 in an immunocompromised population. They report that use of rituximab, use of methotrexate, and younger age increased the risk of repeat COVID-19 among patients with systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

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Validated Score Predicts Which Women Are at Risk of Midlife Declines in Physical Health and Function

Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital used information from two large U.S. cohorts to derive and validate a risk score that predicts clinically meaningful midlife declines in physical health and function among women. Importantly, the score is based on variables that are easy to obtain in clinical practice.

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Brigham Rheumatology’s Cutting-edge Research at ACR 2023

Leaders from the Division of Rheumatology, Inflammation and Immunity at Brigham and Women’s Hospital presented over 120 abstracts and received several awards at the American College of Rheumatology’s 2023 annual Convergence conference. Read about a select portion of their research shared at the meeting.

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New CPPD Disease Classification Criteria Will Facilitate Research and Improve Treatment

Sara K. Tedeschi, MD, MPH, played a key role in developing the recently released American College of Rheumatology and European Alliance of Associations for Rheumatology classification criteria for symptomatic calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. She discusses the collaboration that went into the work and more.

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Deconstructing Rheumatoid Arthritis Through Cell States and Pathways

New research from the Brigham is providing novel insights into rheumatoid arthritis pathology and helping to advance targeted drug development and predict treatment response. Michael Brenner, MD, and Soumya Raychaudhuri, MD, PhD, discuss the efforts of a consortium of members from academic medical centers worldwide.

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TNF Inhibitors Not Very Effective Against Axial Spondyloarthritis in Patients With IBD

Axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Anti-TNF agents are often used to treat concomitant axSpA and IBD. Brigham researchers have presented evidence that TNF inhibitors are less effective for axSpA than for IBD within one year.

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Brigham Researchers Map More Than 2,000 CD1-binding Lipids for T Cells

Brigham scientists developed a method to simultaneously detect more than 2,000 CD1 lipid molecules that are displayed to T cells in the human immune system. This resulted in the first integrated CD1 lipidomic map, guiding the investigation of lipid T cell antigens and cleft blockers in any cellular system or disease.

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Denosumab Use for Osteoporosis May Reduce Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Close up of doctor holding syringe, denosumab medical injection concept

Clinical guidelines recommend denosumab for people with osteoporosis with a high fracture risk. Now, researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital have associated denosumab use with a 32% decreased risk of type 2 diabetes compared with the use of an oral bisphosphonate.

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What Is the Role of Inflammation in the Development of Osteoarthritis After an ACL Injury?

Brigham orthopedist Christian Lattermann, MD, was the principal investigator of a study examining a possible connection between dysregulated inflammatory response and effusion synovitis after an ACL injury. He says risk stratification may help clinicians determine the appropriate treatment approach for each patient.

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Antibody Response to COVID-19 Vaccination Not Affected by Whether RA Patients Interrupt DMARD Therapy

Doctor giving senior female patient the COVID-19 vaccine

In an observational study in “real-world” practice, Brigham and Women’s Hospital researchers did not identify significant differences in antibody response to COVID-19 vaccination among rheumatoid arthritis patients who held versus continued disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs for the last dose of the primary series.

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