Inquire About Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Patients With Endometriosis

Woman sitting on bed and holding abdomen, suffering from endometriosis pain

In the first study of its kind, Iwona Gabriel, MD, PhD, and Vatche A. Minassian, MD, MPH, of the Urogynecology Group, and colleagues found women and adolescents with surgically confirmed endometriosis are at substantially greater risk than others of having multiple lower urinary tract symptoms.

Read More...

Both Types of Liquid Human Milk Fortifier Promote Growth of Very-Low-Birthweight Infants

Newborn baby in NICU

Brigham researchers recently confirmed that administration of acidified human milk fortifier is associated with higher incidence of metabolic acidosis in the first weeks of life for very-low-birthweight infants, but the type of fortifier was not an important determinant of growth during the NICU stay.

Read More...

Improving Microbial Balance in Female Genital Tract May Boost Health Outcomes

Raina Fichorova, MD, PhD, director of the Laboratory of Genital Tract Biology, is a leader in studying host-microbe interactions in the female reproductive tract. Her efforts have included developing a novel “live” biotherapeutic treatment, which she has patented and is now working to bring into clinical trials.

Read More...

Galectin-mediated Immunity Is Dysregulated in Protozoan–Viral–Bacterial Female Genital Tract Infections

3D Rendering Galectin-3

Raina N. Fichorova, MD, PhD, and Hidemi S. Yamamoto, BA, of the Laboratory of Genital Tract Biology in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Brigham, and colleagues have discovered concurrent exposure to Trichomonas vaginalis and bacterial vaginosis dysregulates the expression of galectins.

Read More...

COVID-19–related Psychological Factors Can Interfere with Mother–Infant Bonding

Mother holds and looks down at newborn infant

In a nationwide online survey of pregnant and postpartum women, Cindy H. Liu, PhD, and Carmina Erdei, MD, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and colleagues determined that psychological factors related to COVID-19, particularly grief, pose unique hazards to mother–infant bonding.

Read More...

Several “Forever” Chemicals Are Associated With Increased Risk of Late-onset Preeclampsia

David E. Cantonwine, PhD, of the Division of Maternal–Fetal Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and colleagues recently conducted the first study of PFAS and preeclampsia that distinguished between early- and late-onset preeclampsia, which have different risk factors, severities and pathophysiologies.

Read More...

C-Section Tied to Higher Risk of Postpartum Surgical Complications in Women With IBD

Sonia Friedman, MD, the Center for Crohn’s and Colitis, Bente Mertz Nørgård, DMSc, MD, PhD, and colleagues conducted the first population-based study to evaluate postpartum surgical complications in women with IBD. They report strikingly higher rates after Cesarian section than after vaginal delivery.

Read More...

Brigham Launches Two Specialized Gynecologic Care Centers for Endometriosis and Fibroids

Pelvic endometriosis lesions
Pelvic endometriosis lesions

For patients with endometriosis, fibroids and uterine anomalies, finding the right care can be difficult. In some cases, physicians discount or misdiagnose their concerns and symptoms. In other cases, patients have a hard time finding the right provider — someone who will look beyond an individual symptom and also take their wishes and goals into account when designing a treatment plan.

Read More

New Tool for Reporting Incidents of Discrimination Reflects System-Wide Effort to Promote Health Equity

Discrimination based on factors like race, sexual orientation, gender identity and socioeconomic status are widely pervasive throughout society. The medical field is no exception.

Read More

Beryl Benacerraf, MD, Awarded ‘Giant in Obstetrics and Gynecology’ by AJOG

Beryl Benacerraf, MDFrom her revolutionary work using ultrasound for prenatal diagnosis of congenital anomalies and gynecologic disorders to her discovery that linked nuchal thickening to an increased risk for fetal Down syndrome, Beryl Benacerraf, MD, has changed the way medicine is practiced.

Read More