Review: When Direct Oral Anticoagulants Should Not Be Standard Treatment

Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are preferred to vitamin K antagonists for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation, acute treatment and extended-duration secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism in most patients. However, DOACs may be less efficacious or safe compared to standard of care in other conditions.

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Treatment of Depression/Anxiety in Osteoarthritis Linked to Better Psychological Health But Not Improved Physical Symptoms

Brigham and Women’s Hospital researchers present evidence that pharmacologic treatment of depression/anxiety is associated with improved mental well-being in patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis but doesn’t seem to improve physical function or pain levels.

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Drinkable Hydrogels Bridge the Gap Between Pills and Liquid Therapies

Gary W. Liu, PhD, Giovanni Traverso, MD, PhD, MBBCH, of the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endoscopy at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and colleagues show how a drinkable formulation called LIFT hydrogels could expand access to advanced therapeutics for people who have trouble swallowing pills.

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Ultrasound-First Nephrolithiasis Evaluation for Appropriate Patients Would Reduce U.S. Costs by Millions

Brigham and Women’s Hospital researchers have demonstrated that a point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS)-first approach for evaluating nephrolithiasis in patients who meet certain criteria could produce substantial national cost savings, as well as clinical benefits.

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Scientific Statement: Disparities in Lupus Outcomes and the Role of Social Determinants of Health

A recent scientific statement by The Lupus Foundation of America’s Health Disparities Advisory Panel, which includes Karen Costenbader, MD, MPH, addresses the relationship between social determinants of health and racial and ethnic disparities in lupus. It also recommends potential interventions to reduce disparities.

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Patient-reported Autonomic Symptoms Do Not Correlate With Objective Dysfunction

Brigham and Women’s Hospital researchers have confirmed in a large cohort what previous research suggested: a lack of correlation between subjective dysautonomia and standardized objective testing.

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Deep Brain Stimulation Used to Map Therapeutic Targets for Four Brain Disorders

Using deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a research tool, Brigham and Women’s Hospital scientists have identified distinct neural circuits for Parkinson’s disease, dystonia, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and Tourette’s syndrome.

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Replacement of cTnI With hs-cTnI for Evaluation of Pulmonary Embolism May Misclassify Risk

Behnood Bikdeli, MD, MS, at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, David Jiménez, MD, PhD, at Hospital Ramón y Cajal in Madrid, and colleagues recently conducted the first study to compare the prognostic relevance of cTnI with hs-cTnI in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE).

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Lipidomics Team Receives Ammodo Science Award for Tuberculosis Research

A multi-institutional research group co-led by D. Branch Moody, MD, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, received an Ammodo Science Award for their groundbreaking research on lipid molecules. Their goal is to develop effective diagnostic tests and vaccines against tuberculosis and other infectious diseases.

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Brigham Researchers Uncover Link Between Metformin and Appetite Suppression

Controlling a newly discovered pathway between the “anti-hunger” molecule N-lactoyl phenylalanine (Lac-Phe) and the widely prescribed diabetes drug metformin could lead to viable strategies to reduce body mass and improve health in millions of people. Lydia Lynch, PhD, and Marie McDonnell, MD, discuss their study.

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